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20121223
20121223
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beyond the schoolhouse door. miguel? >> a tough question in washington but what can only be described by a rant on friday by wayne lapierre what is your sense of it? the tone of it the fact he blamed anybody but didn't see any role for the nra to really play in this, how did that play, you think, in washington? >> reporter: well, the media machine that he referenced, i think you can well imagine, a good deal of the press corps found themselves perhaps scratching their head about that one. some people, of course, do support the nra and mr. lapierre. i think the real question, as you say, is one now of political muscle. will those who want to see more gun laws enacted have the political muscle now to get the votes for some new legislation, either on banning weapon sales or banning the high-powered magazines or will the nra be able, even after all of this and the growing sentiment by all accounts across the country, will they still have the political muscle that they have had for so many years to push back against any new legislation? >> very interesting. thank you very much, barbara sta
up with. statements from the founding fathers about our guns. toward washington. -- george washington. try to stop gun sales in this country, you will run into a series of roadblocks. >> australia had a mass killing in the mid-1990s and they passed a severe loss where all existing guns had to be turned in. the government bought them back. after a certain date if they were in your home, you were arrested. they have had a decrease in crime and suicide, which is an interesting development. it seems to me, you either have to go that route, which you cannot in the u.s. -- gun ownership in australia was 5% of households. gallup has shown is 47% here. we have the second amendment and the history back to washington. given that we are a different culture, the kinds of laws that we pass are almost always an effective as a result, because there are 300 million weapons out there today. unless you recall them the way that australia did, and we cannot do that -- you would have a reservoir that would last 100 years. >> you can imagine what would happen. there would be an insurrection. >> you do not
wahoo >> the house will stand in recess subject to the chair. >> this week on "in some washington" john boehner plus plan collapses and the house goes home for christmas. >> it is hard to wrap your mind around it but someone so young in such a peaceful community over such an ardent a bent pin down another massacre and another called for gun-control. >> the fact that this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> handle after the state department report on benghazi, but are they the right ones? >> the security posture of the compound was inadequate for the threat environment, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attack which took place that night. >> will former republican senator chuck kagel and make it to the pentagon? >> the house did not take up the tax measure today because it did on have suffient support from our members to pass. house speaker john boehner's statement thursday evening as he stood in print of the republican conference, he recited the serenity prayer. god, grant me theereny to acpt the tngs which i cannot change and close t
's barbara stahr following the story from washington. hello to you. what's the case that the nra is making right now? >> well, look, you know, wane la pierre is the chief executive officer. he is the public face of the national rifle association. going on nbc's "meet the press" this morning, he made the point again and again that he made back on friday at that press conference. that his organization will oppose legislation at adding new restrictions to the sale of weapons or the sale of those high capacity ammunition magazines, and he had a lot to say again about who he thinks is to blame. have a listen. >> look, i know there's a media machine in this country that wants to blame guns every time something happens. i know there's an anti-second amendment industry in this town. i know there are political -- for 20 years they always try to say it's because americans own guns. i'm telling you what i think will make people safe. what every mom and dad will make them feel better when they drop their kid off at school in january is if we have a police officer in that school, a good guy, that if so
at schools we are learning more about adam lanza. the washington post today has a quote from his former first grade teacher who says there was a quiet depth to him that i couldn't penetrate. let's bring in national political reporter and bob franken, a syndicated columnist. welcome to both of you. before we get started i want to play you more on the interview on "meet the press" this morning. >> if it is crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children then call me crazy. i will tell you what the american people, i think the american people think it is crazy not to do it. it is the one thing that would keep people safe and the nra is going to try to do that. >> immediately following the interview new york senator chuck schumer called wayne lapierre tone deaf. what do you make of the discussion that the nation and the lawmakers are having around gun control especially considering how often these conversations seem to flare up after something horrible like this and fade just as quickly? >> it does fade just as quickly because the gun lobby terifies any p
spending and raise taxes. what will happen? national correspondent live in washington with the details. good morning, steve. >> good morning, eric. the two sides in the fiscal cliff debate had their say before heading home for christmas, but no deal of course. after house speaker john boehner called off his push for a plan b last week saying the ball is now in the democrats' court. there has been no movement toward any deal. democrats want tax hikes for the wealthy. republicans want spending cuts. and some in the gop say the president doesn't want to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> when i listen to the president, i think the president is eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. i think he sees a political victory at the bottom of the cliff. he gets all of this additional tax revenue for new programs and he gets to cut the military which democrats have been calling for for years and he gets to blame republicans for it. >> president obama for his part said he is optimistic a deal can still be reached. he spoke at the white house friday before leaving for hawaii where he is now. but
, is there any validity to these bombastic charges against the press. joining us now here in washington, terence smith, former correspondent for pbs news hour and cbs news and "new york times." and tom foreman who attended friday's nra event. tom, what was it like being at this nra event? i won't call it a press conference. are you surprised that not a single journalist got to ask a question? >> it was not a press conference. all of us expected to exchange questions and answers with wayne lapierre and the president of nra who was there. it didn't happen at all. it did not happen but adamantly did not happen. several of us tried to call out questions to the participants and even at one point i said to them, would you answer even one question? are you willing to talk to the white house about any of this, even to that, they just kept walking. that was a big disappointment and sort of set the tone for the room. >> when wayne lapierre said falsehoods about semiautomatic weapons and the media are demonizing gun owners, is he right? >> no. but even before that what he got was a priceless gift of 25 min
or requirements that we talked about? >> guest: well, george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: so people used these on the frontier, protection against the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then during the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: exactly. the right, the common law right to have and use firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of the militias? >> guest: well, local commanders, towns had them, in new england certainly, and later on, they became more broadly based, but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities and the colonists, the approach to revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans kne
washington," john boehner's plan b collalapses and the house goes home for christmas. >> it is hard to get y your mind around said that someone so young could leave us, and such a peaceful communi such an horrific event. >> anonother massacre and another called for gun-control. >> the fact of this problem is complex can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. >> hands brawl after the state depapartment report on benghazi, but are they theey right hands? >> the compound was inadequate for the threat environmnment in benghazi, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place that night. >> wilill former republican senator chuck hagel makee it to the pentntagon? >> the house did not take up the tax measure today because it t did not have suffificient support from our mberto pass. house speaker john boehner's statement on thursday evening as he stood in front of the house republican conference on thursday night, he recited the serenity prayer. don, grarant me the serenity to accept the things that i cannot change, and close the house for business until after christmasas
of or at least making smoking pot legal in colorado as well as the state of washington. so, is that a sign that perhaps our future use of pot is actually becoming more accepted? >> well, the ones that are taking the brunt of this blow and are being devastated are our teens. this is a very serious epidemic that the obama administration cannot ignore. when you have numbers coming out that tell us we have over 100,000 teens that are going into treatment per year for marijuana treatment and we have an 80% increase, that's new users from 2008, to 2012, that's new users from 12 to 17, that's a serious epidemic, so, yes, we're in serious, serious trouble when it comes to our teens and mental capacity. >> kelly: if we make this an acceptable practice in all of our states, we're causing harm, as you say to our children and it may hamper their educational development and development as adults? >> well, we have great studies that tell us once they start smoking marijuana their iq drops significantly. their sports activities decline, their mathematical skills decline. and in fact, here is something t
& prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of begin the conversation is to say the rich have always been with us, after all. and, actually, that's not true. and one of the points, really the starting point of my book is to say, actually, things are different now. and we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that income inequality has grown hugely in the united states and in the western industrialized world and, indeed, around the world and that a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? okay. i'm so short, i have to move the mic. a lot of the action is at the very, very top of the income distribution. so to just give you a quick sense
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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